Section: Fashion

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Design, Fashion, Photography
TUESDAY
06.25.2013

by / kihada
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Vancouver, re-fashioned through the Lens of a Luminary.

Location, location, location… There’s a reason why Kihada Kreative studio resides and thrives in Vancouver – and it’s all about photographic appeal! During our 15 plus years in the film and commercial photography field, we’ve come to love and understand Vancouver’s advantageous location inside and out. To us, this city is ideal for marketing and commercial photography, because it’s a diverse and versatile environment that can become just about anything – if you’ve got the right know-how. With such a mild climate, a colourful spectrum of weather (sometimes experienced all in one day), a mosaic of cultural districts & architecture and a variety of landscapes to choose from, ours is the perfect city to shoot any type of production. European fashion ad? Hit up Gastown. New York vogue? The streets downtown await. Glacial water promo? Grouse or Cypress, 365 days of the year. You can even turn StanleyPark, VanDusenGardens, and Lynn Headwaters into a Tolkien forest. Nothing against travel and adventure – but why look anywhere else?

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Eco Finds, Events, Fashion
THURSDAY
04.04.2013

by / kihada
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Green’s the new Tangerine Tango at Eco Fashion Week Vancouver!

It’s no big secret that the fashion industry is one of the economy’s biggest sellers, bringing in over $300 billion in annual revenue. But how many of us stop mid-stride at the boutique or halfway through Vogue magazine to consider the cost? The truth is, it’s the world’s natural ecosystems and the stability of just societies that pay for this year’s pumps, not the corporate bank accounts. That’s why the fashion industry ranks third among the most environmentally damaging industries in the world. So what hope can we have for its long-term viability? Eco Fashion Week seeks to solve this riddle.

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Fashion
THURSDAY
01.26.2012

by / kihada
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Soft, Sexy, and Sustainable Soleone

It’s a panda’s favourite snack. The trademark flora of Southeast Asian forests. An exotic addition to living room décor. And now, the latest innovation in clothing and textiles. That’s right – now you can snuggle under bamboo fibre sheets, tousle freshly-showered hair with bamboo fibre towels, and best of all, wear luxuriously comfortable bamboo fibre clothing that’s good for both you and the environment.

Fashion
SATURDAY
05.01.2010

by / kihada
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Levis Brand and Culture

The privately held clothing company known worldwide for its Levi’s brand of denim jeans. It was founded in 1853 when Levi Strauss came from Bavaria, Germany to San Francisco, California to open a west coast branch of his brothers’ New York dry goods business. Levi Strauss was born Loeb Strauss in Buttenheim, in the Franconian region of Bavaria, Germany, to Hirsch Strauss and his wife Rebecca (Haass) Strauss. At the age of 18, Strauss, his mother and two sisters sailed for the United States to join his brothers Jonas and Louis, who had begun a wholesale dry goods business in New York City called J. Strauss Brother & Co. By 1850, Strauss was calling himself Levi. The family decided to open a West Coast branch of the family dry goods business in San Francisco, which was the commercial hub of the California Gold Rush. Levi was chosen to represent the family, and after becoming an American citizen in January of 1853, he got on a California-bound steamer which left New York for the isthmus of Panama around February 5, 1853. He crossed the isthmus and then caught another steamship for San Francisco, arriving in early March, 1853. Strauss opened his dry goods wholesale business as Levi Strauss & Co. and imported fine dry goods – clothing, bedding, combs, purses, handkerchiefs – from his brothers in New York. He sold the goods to the small general stores and men’s mercantiles of California and the West. Around 1856 Levi’s sister Fanny, her husband David Stern and their infant son Jacob moved from New York to San Francisco to join the business. In late 1870 Jacob Davis, a Reno, Nevada tailor, started making men’s work pants with metal rivets at points of strain for greater strength. He wanted to patent the process but needed a business partner, so he turned to Levi Strauss, from whom he purchased some of his fabric. On May 20, 1873, Strauss and Davis received United States patent #139121 for using copper rivets to strengthen the pockets of denim work pants. Levi Strauss & Co. began manufacturing the famous Levi’s brand of jeans, using fabric from the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in Manchester, New Hampshire. In his later years Levi expanded the tradition of philanthropy which he had begun soon after his arrival in San Francisco. For example, he was a Vice President of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children  and gave money to a number of disaster relief efforts, such as the great Chicago Fire. In 1897 he established scholarships for poor students at the University of California, Berkeley. Levi Strauss died in 1902 at the age of 73. He never married, so he left the business to his four nephews, Jacob, Sigmund, Louis and Abraham Stern, the sons of his sister Fanny and her husband David Stern. He also left bequests to a number of charities such as the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum. Levi’s fortune was estimated to be around 6 million dollars. He was buried in Colma, California. Mr. Strauss was inducted into the Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame in 1994.